Popular Anthony Bourdain Quotes

I urge you to travel – as far and as widely as possible. Sleep on floors if you have to.


It’s an irritating reality that many places and events defy description. Angkor Wat and Machu Picchu, for instance, seem to demand silence, like a love affair you can never talk about. For a while after, you fumble for words, trying vainly to assemble a private narrative, an explanation, a comfortable way to frame where you’ve been and whats happened. In the end, you’re just happy you were there – with your eyes open – and lived to see it.


As you move through this life…you leave marks behind, however small. And in return, life – and travel – leaves marks on you.


If I’m an advocate for anything, it’s to move. As far as you can, as much as you can. Across the ocean, or simply across the river. The extent to which you can walk in someone else’s shoes or at least eat their food, it’s a plus for everybody. Open your mind, get up off the couch, move.


The journey is part of the experience – an expression of the seriousness of one’s intent. One doesn’t take the A train to Mecca.


Travel changes you. As you move through this life and this world you change things slightly, you leave marks behind, however small. And in return, life – and travel – leaves marks on you. Most of the time, those marks – on your body or on your heart – are beautiful. Often, though, they hurt.


I lurched away from the table after a few hours feeling like Elvis in Vegas – fat, drugged, and completely out of it.


To me, life without veal stock, pork fat, sausage, organ meat, demi-glace, or even stinky cheese is a life not worth living.


Avoid at all costs that vile spew you see rotting in oil in screwtop jars. Too lazy to peel fresh? You don’t deserve to eat garlic.


Context and memory play powerful roles in all the truly great meals in one’s life.


your body is not a temple, it’s an amusement park. Enjoy the ride.


Good food is very often, even most often, simple food.


You know, from age 17 on, my paycheck was coming from cooking and working in kitchens.


I’ve long believed that good food, good eating, is all about risk. Whether we’re talking about unpasteurized Stilton, raw oysters or working for organized crime ‘associates,’ food, for me, has always been an adventure


The roots of creativity of cooking are hungry people trying to figure out how to take something that’s not particularly fresh or tender and transform it into it something delicious that everyone will love.