Famous Jane Austen Quotes

We are all fools in love


The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love.


We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.


What do you know of my heart? What do you know of anything but your own suffering?


In a letter from Bath to her sister, Cassandra, one senses her frustration at her sheltered existence, Tuesday, 12 May 1801. Another stupid party . . . with six people to look on, and talk nonsense to each other.


The younger brother must help to pay for the pleasures of the elder.


It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.


I would rather have young people settle on a small income at once, and have to struggle with a few difficulties together, than be involved in a long engagement.


I always deserve the best treatment because I never put up with any other.


Better be without sense than misapply it as you do.


They are much to be pitied who have not been given a taste for nature early in life.


Human nature is so well disposed towards those who are in interesting situations, that a young person, who either marries or dies, is sure of being kindly spoken of.


How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!


One man’s ways may be as good as another’s, but we all like our own best.


Evil to some is always good to others


There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome.” “And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody.” “And yours,” he replied with a smile, “is willful to misunderstand them.


Is there not something wanted, Miss Price, in our language – a something between compliments and – and love – to suit the sort of friendly acquaintance we have had together?


The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Wood house had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have recommended him at any time.


Her eye fell everywhere on lawns and plantations of the freshest green; and the trees, though not fully clothed, were in that delightful state when farther beauty is known to be at hand, and when, while much is actually given to the sight, more yet remains for the imagination.


A lady’s imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.