Nelson Mandela Quotes

On the first day of school, my teacher, Miss Mdingane, gave each of us an English name and said that from thenceforth that was the name we would answer to in school. This was the custom among Africans in those days and was undoubtedly due to the British bias of our education.


We owe our children – the most vulnerable citizens in any society – a life free from violence and fear.


“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”


No country can really develop unless its citizens are educated.


Nonviolence is a good policy when the conditions permit.


The best weapon is to sit down and talk.


Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all.


Courageous people do not fear forgiving, for the sake of peace.


If you want to make peace with your enemy, you have to work with your enemy. Then he becomes your partner.


There are many people who feel that it is useless and futile to continue talking about peace and non-violence against a government whose only reply is savage attacks on an unarmed and defenseless people.


Negotiation and discussion are the greatest weapons we have for promoting peace and development.


There is nothing I fear more than waking up without a program that will help me bring a little happiness to those with no resources, those who are poor, illiterate, and ridden with terminal disease.


There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you….


I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.


We owe our children – the most vulnerable citizens in any society – a life free from violence and fear.


Be a lifelong student, read as many books as possible.


There are times when a leader must move out ahead of the flock, go off in a new direction, confident that he is leading his people the right way.


You will achieve more in this world through acts of mercy than you will through acts of retribution.


One of the things I learned when I was negotiating was that until I changed myself, I could not change others.


It is better to lead from behind and to put others in front.


A real leader uses every issue, no matter how serious and sensitive, to ensure that at the end of the debate we should emerge stronger and more united than ever before.


Success in politics demands that you must take your people into confidence about your views and state them very clearly, very politely, very calmly, but nevertheless, state them openly.


If you want to make peace with your enemy, you have to work with your enemy. Then he becomes your partner.


A good leader can engage in a debate frankly and thoroughly, knowing that at the end he and the other side must be closer, and thus emerge stronger. You don’t have that idea when you are arrogant, superficial, and uninformed.


I like a leader who can, while pointing out a mistake, bring up the good things the other person has done. If you do that, then the person sees that you have a complete picture of him. There is nobody more dangerous than one who has been humiliated, even when you humiliate him rightly.


What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.


A leader . . . is like a shepherd. He stays behind the flock, letting the most nimble go out ahead, whereupon the others follow, not realizing that all along they are being directed from behind.


It is better to lead from behind and to put others in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur. You take the front line when there is danger. Then people will appreciate your leadership.